Program

Monday, October 31, 2011

09:00         Welcome and introduction
09:15         Session 1: “Individual differences in time perception”
                   Christine Falter, Groningen, NL
                   Introduction and talks
                   A. John Wearden (Keele University, UK): 
                   Timing processes in the elderly.
                   B. Christine Falter (University of Groningen, NL):
                   Timing abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders.
                   C. Katya Rubia (King's College London, UK):
                   Neurofunctional development of timing & its abnormality in ADHD.
                   D. Sylvie Droit-Volet (Université Blaise Pascal à Clermont- Ferrand, FR): 
                   Individual differences in the development of timing processes.
                   Discussant: Valdas Noreika (University of Turku, FIN)
11:05         Coffee Break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   Noreika, Wearden, Falter, Rubia, Droit-Volet & audience
12:15         Lunch Break
13:45         Poster Session
15:15         Session 2: “Brain dynamics and conscious time”
                   Virginie van Wassenhove, Paris, FR 
                   Introduction and talks
                   A. Charles E Schroeder  (Nathan Kline Institute, NY, USA): 
                   Neuronal dynamics that can support temporal prediction.
                   B. Andreas Kleinschmidt (CEA/NeuroSpin – INSERM, FR):
                   Is there a link between time perception and large-scale
                   neural oscillations?

                   C. Virginie van Wassenhove (CEA/NeuroSpin – INSERM, FR):
                   Multiplexing the encoding of time.
                   D. Alan Johnston (University College London, UK): 
                   How to build a content-dependent clock.
                   Discussant: Michel Treisman (Prof. em. of University of Oxford, UK)
17:05         Coffee Break
17:25         Summary and general discussion
                   Treisman, Schroeder, Kleinschmidt, van Wassenhove, Johnston & audience
18:15         Dinner

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

09:15         Session 3: “Psychophysical investigations of temporal processing”
                    Argiro Vatakis, Athens, GR
                    Introduction and talks
                    A. Armin Kohlrausch (Technical University of Eindhoven, NL): 
                    The influence of stimulus characteristics on synchrony judgments:
                    A role for visual prior information and apparent causality?

                    B. Martin Lankheet (University of Wageningen, NL):
                    Motion processing and visual asynchrony.
                    C. Argiro Vatakis (ILSP, Athens, GR):
                    Audiovisual synchrony perception: Evidence from simple to complex stimuli.
                    D. Marco Cicchini (CNR-PSA, I: 
                    Optimal encoding of interval timing and musical expertise.
                   
Discussant: Toemme Noesselt (University of Magdeburg, DE)
11:05         Coffee break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                    Noesselt, Kohlrausch, Lankheet, Vatakis, Cicchini & audience
12:15          Lunch break
13:45          Keynote Lecture:
                    Till Roenneberg (Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, DE): 
                    Alarm clocks are more costly than we think.
15:15          Session 4: “The brain and the present now”
                    Marc Wittmann, IGPP Freiburg, DE
                    Introduction and talks
                    A. A.D. (Bud) Craig (Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, USA): 
                    Emotional moments across time: A possible neural basis
                    for time perception in the anterior insula.
                   
B. Julian Kiverstein (University of Amsterdam, NL):
                    Time, consciousness and interoception.
                   
C. Jiří Wackermann (IGPP Freiburg, DE):
                    Structure of time experience: Boundaries and horizons.
                   
D. Barry Dainton (University of Liverpool, UK): 
                    Temporal consciousness.
                   
Discussant: Marc Wittmann (IGPP Freiburg, DE)
17:05         Coffee Break
17.25         Summary and general discussion
                    Wittmann, Craig, Wackermann, Kiverstein, Dainton & audience
18:15         Dinner

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

09:15         Session 5: “Functional plasticity of temporal processing”
                    Dorothe Poggel, Delmenhorst, DE
                    Introduction and talks
                    A. Arash Sahraie (University of Aberdeen, UK): 
                    Plasticity of temporal perception in blindsight patients.
                    
B. John Stein (University of Oxford, UK):
                    Timing and sequencing in dyslexia.
                    C
. Dorothe Poggel (HWK, Delmenhorst, DE): 
                    Temporal aspects of visual perception and functional restoration
                    in patients with visual field loss.
                   
Discussant: Manfred Fahle (University of Bremen, DE)
11:05         Coffee Break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                    Fahle, Sahraie, Stein, Poggel & audience
12:15         Lunch Break
13:00         End of symposium

Time and the Conscious Brain

October 31 - November 2, 2011


Venue:

Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg
Lehmkuhlenbusch 4
27753 Delmenhorst
Germany

Organizers:

Dr. Dorothe Poggel, Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg, Delmenhorst
PD Dr. Marc Wittmann, IGPP, Freiburg

 

Time cannot be subtracted from our understanding of the world because it is interwoven with our existence and subjective experience. The problem how the brain manages temporal information is no less mysterious and intriguing than the physical dimension of time itself. A clearer insight into those brain mechanisms would be important for explaining the phenomenon of consciousness. In addition to valuable theoretical and basic science information, the explanation of individual differences in time perception and temporal processing would be of great practical value in terms of adapting and optimizing environments or individual behavior, both in healthy and in clinical populations.

This international and interdisciplinary symposium will bring together researchers in the fields of chronobiology, philosophy, psychophysical research, neuroimaging/ electrophysiology, and neuropsychology. Through our co-operation with the EU TIMELY/ COST initiative and with other renowned research groups, we were able to confirm an impressive list of speakers for this meeting. Talks are organized in five sessions: individual differences in time perception, brain dynamics and conscious time, psychophysical investigations of temporal processing, the brain and the “present now”, and functional plasticity of temporal processing. Presentations will be relatively short but each session includes an extended general discussion moderated by a qualified discussant. The idea is to use the symposium as a breeding ground for new research ideas, collaborations, and common publications based on the broad range of methods and disciplines instead of the usual field-specific meetings. In addition to the talks, there will be poster presentations of young scientists and a keynote lecture on chronobiology

Time and the Conscious Brain

October 31 - November 2, 2011


Venue:

Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg
Lehmkuhlenbusch 4
27753 Delmenhorst
Germany

Organizers:

Dr. Dorothe Poggel, Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg, Delmenhorst
PD Dr. Marc Wittmann, IGPP, Freiburg

 

Time cannot be subtracted from our understanding of the world because it is interwoven with our existence and subjective experience. The problem how the brain manages temporal information is no less mysterious and intriguing than the physical dimension of time itself. A clearer insight into those brain mechanisms would be important for explaining the phenomenon of consciousness. In addition to valuable theoretical and basic science information, the explanation of individual differences in time perception and temporal processing would be of great practical value in terms of adapting and optimizing environments or individual behavior, both in healthy and in clinical populations.

This international and interdisciplinary symposium will bring together researchers in the fields of chronobiology, philosophy, psychophysical research, neuroimaging/ electrophysiology, and neuropsychology. Through our co-operation with the EU TIMELY/ COST initiative and with other renowned research groups, we were able to confirm an impressive list of speakers for this meeting. Talks are organized in five sessions: individual differences in time perception, brain dynamics and conscious time, psychophysical investigations of temporal processing, the brain and the “present now”, and functional plasticity of temporal processing. Presentations will be relatively short but each session includes an extended general discussion moderated by a qualified discussant. The idea is to use the symposium as a breeding ground for new research ideas, collaborations, and common publications based on the broad range of methods and disciplines instead of the usual field-specific meetings. In addition to the talks, there will be poster presentations of young scientists and a keynote lecture on chronobiology

Time and the Conscious Brain

October 31 - November 2, 2011


Venue:

Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg
Lehmkuhlenbusch 4
27753 Delmenhorst
Germany

Organizers:

Dr. Dorothe Poggel, Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg, Delmenhorst
PD Dr. Mark Wittmann, University of Freiburg

 

Time cannot be subtracted from our understanding of the world because it is interwoven with our existence and subjective experience. The problem how the brain manages temporal information is no less mysterious and intriguing than the physical dimension of time itself. A clearer insight into those brain mechanisms would be important for explaining the phenomenon of consciousness. In addition to valuable theoretical and basic science information, the explanation of individual differences in time perception and temporal processing would be of great practical value in terms of adapting and optimizing environments or individual behavior, both in healthy and in clinical populations.

This international and interdisciplinary symposium will bring together researchers in the fields of chronobiology, philosophy, psychophysical research, neuroimaging/ electrophysiology, and neuropsychology. Through our co-operation with the EU TIMELY/ COST initiative and with other renowned research groups, we were able to confirm an impressive list of speakers for this meeting. Talks are organized in five sessions: individual differences in time perception, brain dynamics and conscious time, psychophysical investigations of temporal processing, the brain and the “present now”, and functional plasticity of temporal processing. Presentations will be relatively short but each session includes an extended general discussion moderated by a qualified discussant. The idea is to use the symposium as a breeding ground for new research ideas, collaborations, and common publications based on the broad range of methods and disciplines instead of the usual field-specific meetings. In addition to the talks, there will be poster presentations of young scientists and a keynote lecture on chronobiology

Preliminary Program

Monday, October 31, 2011

09:00         Welcome and introduction
09:15         Session 1: “Individual differences in time perception”
                   Christine Falter, Oxford, UK
                   Introduction and talks
                   A. John Wearden (Keele University, UK): 
                   Timing processes in the elderly.
                   B. Christine Falter (University of Oxford, UK):
                   Timing processes in Autism Spectrum Disorders.
                   C. Katya Rubia (King's College London, UK):
                   Normal development of timing processes and their abnormalities in ADHD.
                   D. Sylvie Droit-Volet (Université Blaise Pascal à Clermont- Ferrand, FR): 
                   Individual differences in the development of timing processes.
                   Discussant: Valdas Noreika (University of Turku, FIN)
11:05         Coffee Break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   Noreika, Wearden, Falter, Rubia, Droit-Volet & audience
12:15         Lunch Break
13:45         Poster Session
15:15         Session 2: “Brain dynamics and conscious time”
                   Virginie van Wassenhove, Paris, FR 
                   Introduction and talks
                   A. Charles E Schroeder  (Nathan Kline Institute, NY, USA): 
                   Neural temporal processes and oscillatory hierarchy.
                   B. Andreas Kleinschmidt (CEA/NeuroSpin – INSERM, FR):
                   Subjective time estimation and neural peak frequency.
                   C. Virginie van Wassenhove (CEA/NeuroSpin – INSERM, FR):
                   From temporal processes to subjective time across sensory modalities.
                   D. Alan Johnston (University College London, UK): 
                   Visual adaptation and local clocks.
                   Discussant: Michel Treisman (Prof. em. of University of Oxford, UK)
17:05         Coffee Break
17:25         Summary and general discussion
                   Treisman, Schroeder, Kleinschmidt, van Wassenhove, Johnston & audience
18:15         Dinner

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

09:15         Session 3: “Psychophysical investigations of temporal processing”
                    Argiro Vatakis, Athens, GR
                    Introduction and talks
                    A. Armin Kohlrausch (Technical University of Eindhoven, NL): 
                    The influence of stimulus characteristics on synchrony judgments:
                    A role for visual prior information and apparent causality?

                    B. Martin Lankheet (University of Wageningen, NL):
                    Visual asynchrony.
                    C. Argiro Vatakis (ILSP, Athens, GR):
                    Audiovisual synchrony perception: Evidence from simple to complex stimuli.
                    D. David Burr (University of Florence, I):
                    Temporal mechanisms of multi-modal binding.
                   
Discussant: Toemme Noesselt (University of Magdeburg, DE)
11:05         Coffee break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   
Noesselt, Kohlrausch, Lankheet, Vatakis, Burr & audience
12:15         Lunch break
13:45         Keynote Lecture:
                   Till Roenneberg (Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, DE): 
                   Chronobiology: What's the real price of an alarm clock?
15:15         Session 4: “The brain and the present now”
                    
Marc Wittmann, Freiburg, DE
                    Introduction and talks
                   
A. A.D. (Bud) Craig (Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, USA): 
                    Emotional moments across time: a possible neural basis
                    for time perception in the anterior insula.
                   
B. Julian Kiverstein (University of Edinburgh, UK):
                    Minimal sense of self, temporality and the brain.
                   
C. Jiří Wackermann (IGPP Freiburg, DE):
                    Inner and outer horizons of time experience.
                   
D. Barry Dainton (University of Liverpool, UK): 
                    Temporal consciousness.
                   
Discussant: Marc Wittmann (IGPP Freiburg, DE)
17:05         Coffee Break
17.25         Summary and general discussion
                    
Wittmann, Craig, Wackermann, Kiverstein, Dainton & audience
18:15         Dinner

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

09:15         Session 5: “Functional plasticity of temporal processing”
                   
Dorothe Poggel, Delmenhorst, DE
                    Introduction and talks
                   
A. Arash Sahraie (University of Aberdeen, UK): 
                    Training of temporal functions in blindsight patients.
                    
B. Lutz Jäncke (University of Zurich, CH):
                    Training of temporal functions and changes in neural networks 
                    of consciousness in musicians, synesthetes, and normal subjects.

                    C. John Stein (University of Oxford, UK):
                    Temporal processing and dyslexia, therapies.
                    
D. Dorothe Poggel (HWK, Delmenhorst, DE): 
                    Improvement of temporal processing in patients with vision loss 
                    during visual training.
                   
Discussant: Manfred Fahle (University of Bremen, DE)
11:05         Coffee Break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   
Fahle, Sahraie, Jäncke, Stein, Poggel & audience
12:15         Lunch Break
13:00         End of symposium

Program

Monday, October 31, 2011

09:00         Welcome and introduction
09:15         Session 1: “Individual differences in time perception”
                   Christine Falter, Groningen, NL
                   Introduction and talks
                   A. John Wearden (Keele University, UK): 
                   Timing processes in the elderly.
                   B. Christine Falter (University of Groningen, NL):
                   Timing abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders.
                   C. Katya Rubia (King's College London, UK):
                   Neurofunctional development of timing & its abnormality in ADHD.
                   D. Sylvie Droit-Volet (Université Blaise Pascal à Clermont- Ferrand, FR): 
                   Individual differences in the development of timing processes.
                   Discussant: Valdas Noreika (University of Turku, FIN)
11:05         Coffee Break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   Noreika, Wearden, Falter, Rubia, Droit-Volet & audience
12:15         Lunch Break
13:45         Poster Session
15:15         Session 2: “Brain dynamics and conscious time”
                   Virginie van Wassenhove, Paris, FR 
                   Introduction and talks
                   A. Charles E Schroeder  (Nathan Kline Institute, NY, USA): 
                   Neuronal dynamics that can support temporal prediction.
                   B. Andreas Kleinschmidt (CEA/NeuroSpin – INSERM, FR):
                   Is there a link between time perception and large-scale
                   neural oscillations?

                   C. Virginie van Wassenhove (CEA/NeuroSpin – INSERM, FR):
                   Multiplexing the encoding of time.
                   D. Alan Johnston (University College London, UK): 
                  How to build a content-dependent clock.
                   Discussant: Michel Treisman (Prof. em. of University of Oxford, UK)
17:05         Coffee Break
17:25         Summary and general discussion
                   Treisman, Schroeder, Kleinschmidt, van Wassenhove, Johnston & audience
18:15         Dinner

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

09:15         Session 3: “Psychophysical investigations of temporal processing”
                    Argiro Vatakis, Athens, GR
                    Introduction and talks
                    A. Armin Kohlrausch (Technical University of Eindhoven, NL): 
                    The influence of stimulus characteristics on synchrony judgments:
                    A role for visual prior information and apparent causality?

                    B. Martin Lankheet (University of Wageningen, NL):
                    Motion processing and visual asynchrony.
                    C. Argiro Vatakis (ILSP, Athens, GR):
                    Audiovisual synchrony perception: Evidence from simple to complex stimuli.
                    D. Marco Cicchini (CNR-PSA, I: 
                    Optimal encoding of interval timing and musical expertise.
                   
Discussant: Toemme Noesselt (University of Magdeburg, DE)
11:05         Coffee break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   
Noesselt, Kohlrausch, Lankheet, Vatakis, Cicchini & audience
12:15         Lunch break
13:45         Keynote Lecture:
                   Till Roenneberg (Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, DE): 
                   Alarm clocks are more costly than we think.
15:15         Session 4: “The brain and the present now”
                    
Marc Wittmann, IGPP Freiburg, DE
                    Introduction and talks
                   
A. A.D. (Bud) Craig (Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, USA): 
                    Emotional moments across time: A possible neural basis
                    for time perception in the anterior insula.
                   
B. Julian Kiverstein (University of Amsterdam, NL):
                    Time, consciousness and interoception.
                   
C. Jiří Wackermann (IGPP Freiburg, DE):
                    Structure of time experience: Boundaries and horizons.
                   
D. Barry Dainton (University of Liverpool, UK): 
                    Temporal consciousness.
                   
Discussant: Marc Wittmann (IGPP Freiburg, DE)
17:05         Coffee Break
17.25         Summary and general discussion
                    
Wittmann, Craig, Wackermann, Kiverstein, Dainton & audience
18:15         Dinner

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

09:15         Session 5: “Functional plasticity of temporal processing”
                   
Dorothe Poggel, Delmenhorst, DE
                    Introduction and talks
                   
A. Arash Sahraie (University of Aberdeen, UK): 
                    Plasticity of temporal perception in blindsight patients.
                    
B. John Stein (University of Oxford, UK):
                    Timing and sequencing in dyslexia.
                    C
. Dorothe Poggel (HWK, Delmenhorst, DE): 
                    Temporal aspects of visual perception and functional restoration
                    in patients with visual field loss.
                   
Discussant: Manfred Fahle (University of Bremen, DE)
11:05         Coffee Break
11:25         Summary and general discussion
                   
Fahle, Sahraie, Stein, Poggel & audience
12:15         Lunch Break
13:00         End of symposium

Application procedure for graduate students

Please note that students who already applied via the TIMELY/COST network (Co-ordinator: Dr. Argiro Vatakis) are not required to apply to the HWK again! 

Students up to PhD level are invited to apply for sponsored participation to present a poster at the symposium. Selected students pay a subsidized fee of 25 EUR which covers workshop material, three nights in a hotel (including breakfast), shuttle service between the hotel to the conference site, daily lunch, coffee breaks, and dinner. Note, however, that travel costs are not included in the workshop fee. An application form can be downloaded below. Students will be selected on the basis of their abstract. Please note that the number of student participants is limited to 5. Applications should be sent to Marion Daniel at the Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (Email). Once your application is accepted, you will receive a registration form by email with further instructions regarding bank transfer of conference fees and hotel reservations. Application deadline is September 30, 2011.