Rock Art of Forgotten People

An interdisciplinary workshop about rock art of the Kimberley region, Australia

October 5 - 7, 2017

Venue:

Hanse‐Wissenschaftskolleg, Institute for Advanced Study
Lehmkuhlenbusch 4
27753 Delmenhorst

Rock Art of Forgotten People

An interdisciplinary workshop about rock art of the Kimberley region, Australia

October 5 - 7, 2017

 

Venue:

Hanse‐Wissenschaftskolleg, Institute for Advanced Study
Lehmkuhlenbusch 4
27753 Delmenhorst

The Kimberley region in northern Australia hosts one of the most remarkable and probably oldest rock art of the world. The distributed galleries display mostly humans in ceremonial acts, commonly termed as Bradshaw figures. The paintings are very detailed and abstract at the same time and simply of stunning beauty. Although the art tells us a lot about their living, nothing is known about the origin and the fate of the people who made these unparalleled rock art galleries. The few dating attempts suggest an age of over 35 000 years, but the lack of artifacts and the remoteness of the galleries have so far prevented further research leaving the origin of the paintings a mystery. Recently, new scientific approaches, including molecular biology, opened new insights, raising hopes of lifting the secret of the origin of the forgotten people.
The workshop will summarize the present knowledge about the art galleries and present some of the new data. It is open to interested scientists and non‐scientists.

Further information about the Kimberley Region and its rock art can be found on the following internet pages:
Kimberley Specialists: http://www.kimberleyspecialists.com.au/

The Kimberley region in northern Australia hosts one of the most remarkable and probably oldest rock art of the world. The distributed galleries display mostly humans in ceremonial acts, commonly termed as Bradshaw figures. The paintings are very detailed and abstract at the same time and simply of stunning beauty. Although the art tells us a lot about their living, nothing is known about the origin and the fate of the people who made these unparalleled rock art galleries. The few dating attempts suggest an age of over 35 000 years, but the lack of artifacts and the remoteness of the galleries have so far prevented further research leaving the origin of the paintings a mystery. Recently, new scientific approaches, including molecular biology, opened new insights, raising hopes of lifting the secret of the origin of the forgotten people.
The workshop will summarize the present knowledge about the art galleries and present some of the new data. It is open to interested scientists and non‐scientists.

Further information about the Kimberley Region and its rock art can be found on the following internet pages:
Kimberley Specialists: http://www.kimberleyspecialists.com.au/

Confirmed Speakers

  • Dean Goodgame, KSR, Australia
  • Jack Pettigrew, Queensland University, Australia
  • Joc Schmiechen, Flinders University, Australia
  • Lee Scott Virtue, KSR, Australia
  • Reto Weiler, Rector of the Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg Delmenhorst
  •  

Confirmed Speakers

  • Dean Goodgame, KSR, Australia
  • Jack Pettigrew, Queensland University, Australia
  • Joc Schmiechen, Flinders University, Australia
  • Lee Scott Virtue, KSR, Australia
  • Reto Weiler, Rector of the Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg Delmenhorst
  •  

Downloads

Further information about the Kimberley Region and its rock art can be found on the following internet pages:
Program

 

Downloads

Further information about the Kimberley Region and its rock art can be found on the following internet pages:
Program